Cumulous Skies: The Enduring Modernist Aesthetic in New Mexico

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The Community Gallery is open Tuesday through Friday, 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM and Saturdays from 9:30 AM to 4 PM. For more information call 505-955-6705. This exhibition will be open from March 22 through June 7 2013.

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This event is free and open to the public.

Event Description

The City of Santa Fe Arts Commission’s Community Gallery announces “Cumulous Skies: The Enduring Modernist Aesthetic in New Mexico,” an exhibition exploring the lasting impacts of the Modernist movement in New Mexico. In the early 1900’s numerous Modernists artist such as, John Marin, Andrew Dasburg, Georgia O’Keeffe, Mabel Dodge Luhan, Willard Nash, Josef Bakos, Will Shuster, Walter Mruk, George Bellows, Cady Wells, Rebecca Salsbury James and others, came to New Mexico. They were seeking fresh inspiration through the exploration of the diverse landscape, vivid color and clear light of the high desert. The legacy of these avant-garde artists had a direct impact on the arts, culture and aesthetics of New Mexico’s population, creating a regional movement that expanded within, and far beyond, the borders of New Mexico. The exhibit is curated by Santa Fe artist Lawrence Fodor and is presented with a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

“Cumulous Skies” features artists working in New Mexico whose artwork reflects, translates and sustains the traditions of the New Mexico Modernist Movement. The work of these living artists celebrates the environmental and aesthetic conditions that continue to draw artists to the region today. 

“ There are strong connections between certain artists who came to New Mexico in the early 20th century and the contemporary artists working here today,” states curator Lawrence Fodor, “The correlations and influences are not always direct nor obvious, but there is a definite tenor of aesthetic sensibility based on the environment that is New Mexico and the continuum of artistic freedom that has made New Mexico a locus for inventive and highly creative people.”
The exhibit will include essay material by art historian, artist and independent curator Dr. Sharyn Udall. Of the theme of the exhibit, Udall states, “The best modernist art—whether in 1900 or 2013—sharpens memories of the past and whets our appetites for the future.”

“The legacy of Modernism in New Mexico is so ubiquitous that I think New Mexicans take it for granted," states Rod Lambert, Community Gallery Manager. “Through comparison, it becomes abundantly clear not only how Modernism, as an aesthetic movement, has influenced New Mexico, but perhaps more significantly, the ways in which New Mexico helped define Modernism. The culture, traditions, light, color and ‘sense of place’ of New Mexico nurtured the development of a visual vocabulary that continues to be spoken today, far beyond our state line.”

The exhibit includes work by: Tony Abeyta, John Andolsek, Susanna Carlisle & Bruce Hamilton, Susan Contreras, Constance De Young, Addison Doty, Danae Failiers, Deborah Fleig, Tammy Garcia, Darren Vigil Grey, Bob Hauzous, Tom Joyce, Dara Mark, Arlo Namingha, Nora Naranjo Morse, Ilona Pachler, Chris Richter, Johnnie Winona Ross, Paul Shapiro, Jennifer Schlesinger, Mokha Laget, Lonnie Vigil, Phillip Vigil, Emmi Whitehorse, Michael Wright, Karen Yank and Susan York.

The Community Gallery promotes, sells and exhibits the work of New Mexico artists and artisans, with the emphasis on Santa Fe, through exhibitions, professional training and community involvement in the arts. Community Gallery programming provides a range of services, exhibitions and activities that engage the public as well as support the efforts of local artists and artisans. As a result, the gallery is a hub for viewing and exhibiting exciting artworks and brings the community to art as well as art to the community. For more information about the Community Gallery, visit www.SantaFeArtsCommission.org, send an email to rdlambert@santafenm.gov or call 505-955-6705.

This exhibit is partially funded by the National Endowment for the Arts.

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