August 23, 2012 at 12:18 PM

West Nile Virus in Horses—Nothing to Fool With

By Susie Morgan

Hoof Prints in Santa Fe

Susie Morgan is a lifetime lover of horses, the outdoors and lives for adventures. She lives in Las Campanas, and is reconnecting with horses after working 27 years in New York City.

Advertisement

Immediate Action Advised:  Dr Mark Meddleton, Equine Veterinarian, has the following comments and recommendations.

With the onset of the monsoon rains, the mosquito population has exploded.  This means more exposure to West Nile Virus for us and our horses. 

Facts: 

1.  A horse died from West Nile Virus in Stanley, New Mexico two weeks ago. 

2.  30% of horses that come down with the disease will die.

3. The vaccine is HIGHLY effective. 

All the horses that have had the disease in recent years had not been vaccinated.  Call your vet and vaccinate your horses today.  Remember that Brand Inspectors are out and about, so if you haul your horses, you are at risk if caught not carrying the right paperwork, and health certificate with required vaccinations. 

Below is an advisement from the New Mexico Livestock Board

BE AWARE: Livestock Board inspectors are continuing to be actively involved in VS surveillance and control. This agency's staffing and resources are limited, forcing us to a risk-based assessment of each competitive event in New Mexico as to the level of necessary control; anything from manning the entry gates, to random checks, to road stops and more. Remember, regardless of the type of control, horse owners are required to have a certificate of veterinary inspection to enter any event. If not, a health examination is required in order to get the certification necessary to enter.

UNDERSTAND THE STAKES: Vesicular Stomatitis is a disease of numerous livestock species. New Mexico exports virtually all its cattle and sheep to other states. Those states' confidence in NMLB's competent disease control and surveillance during this VS outbreak is absolutely vital to the economic well being of New Mexico's $5 billion livestock industry.

The trade lanes must remain open. Your assistance and cooperation is critical to our success. 

ONE MORE THING: Our inspectors are doing their duty under the laws and regulations of New Mexico's Livestock Statutes. They are often doing it under stressful conditions and long hours. We ask your assistance and cooperation.

For more information or vaccination, please contact Dr Meddleton at Mark T. Meddleton, DVM Meddleton Equine, Inc. P.O. Box 939, 5 Camino Karsten, Algodones, NM  87001

505-867-5567 or drmeddleton@meddletonequine.com

Advertisement