October 2, 2013 at 2:56 PM

‘Teddy Bears’: A Film Review

'With a comedic twist surrounding Andrew, Dave and Owen’s lust for love, this film leaves you with a direct yet complex question: What do you really want and are you willing to go after it?'

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This blog is written on behalf of the Santa Fe Independent Film Festival and will serve as an honest, unbiased review of a few films that will be screening this year. Hopefully, these reviews will inspire conversation and discussion amongst other viewers and encourage the overall appreciation and dissection of this art we call film. 

Teddy Bears is a youthful story surrounding 6 friends who unknowingly unleash a catastrophic series of comedic events through love, anger, and simply put—awkwardnessas they gather to celebrate their friend’s birthday week.  Directors Beatty and Fishman exemplify the mindset of the average adult in their mid-20’s who is on a journey to figure out what they truly want and need in life.

Andrew, the catalyst for all issues amongst his friends makes a special birthday wish that turns not only the other character’s heads, but also alarms the audience into thinking “did he seriously just ask that?” Andrew at the time is trying to cope with his mother’s recent death, and his solution to peace and love is to enter a graceful embrace (have sex) with his best friend's girlfriends including his own girlfriend Hannah, who is finding it very difficult to deal with her needy, sloth-like boyfriend.

Then we have Dave, the big brother of the group who worries about Andrew, but more concerned with Zoe, the quiet one who has yet to answer his marriage proposal and constantly walks around looking dazed and confused. Alongside Owen, the true asshole of the group who deeply desires to sleep with poor Hannah, is the sweetheart Emily who just wants to comfort and console her friends, and is the only one willing to fulfill Andrew’s ridiculous birthday wish.

These characters portray young adults who are struggling to separate their wants and needs; this film attempts to make you decide which character do you favor more and which one portrays some aspect of your self. By creating such thoughts, Beatty and Fishman tempts you to think what you really want in your life.  With a comedic twist surrounding Andrew, Dave and Owen’s lust for love, this film leaves you with a direct yet complex question: What do you really want and are you willing to go after it? And with a simple “I’m ready” as the catalyst to it all, we are thrust into the pursuit of happiness.

Daeja Jackson is an intern for the Santa Fe Independent Film Festival. Originally from Maryland, she is studying film with a focus on screenwriting and production at Santa Fe University of Art and Design. At SFIFF she is working on social media expeditions and also writing blogs about the films that will be featured this year. She has a passion for cinema and aspires to feature her own work in film festivals some day. 


 

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