Injured Animals Get Second Chance at Santa Fe Animal Shelter

"As the largest animal shelter and care facility in northern New Mexico, the shelter cares for more than 10,000 animals each year"

Date February 3, 2012 at 2:33 PM

Author Editor

Publication SantaFe.com

Categories Education Lectures & Workshops Family

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From a Santa Fe Animal Shelter & Humane Society press release

An increase in animals hit by cars and attacked by wildlife underscores the need for companion animals to be kept securely in their yards and homes.

The Santa Fe Animal Shelter & Humane Society provides urgent medical care to an average of three animals monthly hit by vehicles, said Dr. Nan Hack, medical director. Last week alone the staff helped save two car-struck dogs, bringing the month’s total to four.

Wildlife also can be dangerous to companion animals. Roxy, a dog brought in last Wednesday, had its front leg reportedly injured by a coyote and will need surgical amputation. Last month, two dogs were injured when they encountered a porcupine and hundreds of quills had to be pulled from their bodies. Another stray brought to the shelter clinic suffered an unknown head trauma, which damaged its eye. The eye had to be removed.

“These kinds of injuries require intense medical care and many weeks of healing,” Hack said.

Injured dogs, cats and other homeless companion animals find life-saving help at the Shelter’s clinic. “This is what the Santa Fe Animal Shelter is all about,” said Mary Martin, the shelter’s executive director. “We’re fortunate to have such highly skilled veterinarians who can manage these types of injuries.”

The prognosis for Roxy, the dog attacked by a coyote, is good. Once the leg is amputated and the infection controlled, the dog will be able to walk around much better, Hack said.

Roxy and the other animals treated at the clinic for a variety of injuries will be ready for adoption once they have healed. Foster families provide quiet homes and extra care for many of these animals.

For more information about how you can help the Shelter’s programs, call 983-4309 ext 202. For more info on the shelter's foster programs, call 983-4309 ext. 270.

Since 1939, the Santa Fe Animal Shelter & Humane Society has served northern New Mexico’s animals. As the largest animal shelter and care facility in northern New Mexico, the shelter cares for more than 10,000 animals each year. SFAS&HS is a private, not-for-profit organization. www.sfhumanesociety.org

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